First try at making dialogue!: The Lieutenant

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Arkline041

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Aug 3, 2018
Hi guys! :grin: I go by Arkline. I've been a fan of this game for almost a year now and I've decided to try my hand at making dialogue. I'm a bit of a military otaku and a writer of fanfics so I ended up coming up with this.
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Backstory:

It's been a few months into your service in the Army, and you've finally been promoted! For what exactly? Hard work, dedication and saving your friends' asses after an ambush on your convoy. Though you did end up hospitalized for a while in the process, upon waking up, your squad leader had announced it to you.

While sewing on your new rank patches in the barracks after your release, one of fellow squadmates walked in with news.

"Hey! Congrats on your promotion! You really deserved that. Dragging my ass out of a burning APC isn't no small feat."

You scratch your head, humbled by his words and because of the strange feeling of being praised. Being praised felt awkward, but you were just doing what needed to be done.

Your squadmate glances at the door and speaks, "Oh and, by the way. The sergeant told me to tell ya. The Lieutenant wants to speak to you."

You stop sewing. The mere mention of the Lieutenant scares you. Actually a Lieutenant Colonel, you've heard about her. She was a veteran of several tours of duty in warzones around the world. Most of the soldiers in your platoon talk about how hellishly tough she is on her subordinates, and some say that even some of the more senior officers are intimidated by her as well!

Though at the same time, you remember some of the gossip regarding her. Most of your commanding officers and the soldiers who had been promoted have at multiple points visited her shortly after receiving their promotions. You've also noticed that despite her reputation, they seemed to be very chill around her. During the first time you were assigned when you were just a rookie, there was talk among the men that the Lieutenant got to her position not just through her hard work, but also through...favors. And that the reason why the squad leaders are so relaxed and loyal to her is because of exactly that.

You take a deep breath and put down your uniform. Your squadmate puts an army around your shoulder assuringly.

"Hey, uhhhh, good luck man. I wish I could go with you, but Sarge said she asked for you and you alone," your squadmate says to you. He nudges you on the arm.

"Oh, and if anything happens in there..." he says as he looks around. "...tell us, eh?"

Your squadmate stays in the barracks as you make your way to the admin building of your base. You nervously walk inside, wondering why he sounded so curious, passing other soldiers and officers. You see your squad leader, chatting with other squads' leaders. who strangely shoots you a smile. He mouths something to you, which you make out as "Have a good time".

Huh? Why would he mouth that? It didn't make sense! After all you did?!

You reach her office. The tension reaches breaking point. Why exactly does the Lieutenant ask for newly promoted soldiers to speak to her ALONE?

You knock. "Please come in. The door's open," you hear her voice say. Interesting. You expected her to sound intimidating. She did, but she also sounded very...sensual.

You open the door. Before you is the Lieutenant, standing up and looking out the window of the room, with her back facing you. She's wearing the service uniform, which hugs her curves and shapely ass, something that you only notice now.

She turns around. You get a good look at her now. Woah! There was only one word that could describe her: HOT. AS. FUCK. Her face, despite having a condescending expression, looked so attractive. Her eyes were accentuated with eyeliner and eyeshadow, and her lips with luscious lipstick. Her uniform was also unbuttoned, both coat and blouse, with the coat completely and the blouse exposing some generous cleavage of her rather large breasts, which were accentuated by the straps of magazine pouches and pistol holsters.

"Soldier..." she purrs. "...close the door."

You're sweating buckets as you turn around and slowly close the door. You glance outside and you swear that you just saw a silhouette or two dash around the corner.

You turn back towards the Lieutenant. She's now sitting on the desk, her legs crossed.

"Well. Now that we're alone..." she says as she walks towards you, like a predatory animal stalking her prey.

"Unzip your pants," she commands. "Now."

You hesitate. "What is going on?" you think. Your bombshell of a superior officer was dressed skimpily, talking seductively and ordering you take your pants off! This must be a dream!

"Soldieeeer..." she purrs again, before suddenly shifting back to the more familiar tone of a commander. "Zipper down. NOW."

You reply and sheepishly unzip your pants. You see the Lieutenant get down her knees and pull the hem of your combat fatigues' pants and your briefs down.

You gulped in tense anticipation. This was just the beginning of an interesting day.
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Well here's a military-inspired dialogue that I just came up with in a week. The appearance of the girl is mostly up to you, but I recommend putting the weapon accessories on her (Which is what I did.) If there's any errors or improvements you'd like to point out, please do!

This is isn't usable with the vanilla SDT.
 

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fleet

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Having worked as a civil servant at a US Army post for quite a few years, I can safely say that lieutenant colonels are never referred to as 'lieutenant'. Sometimes they are referred to as colonel in conversations.
Here's some information on US Army structure and ranks of commanders.
  • Squad/section. A squad, which is the smallest element in the Army structure, is typically made up of four to 10 soldiers and normally is commanded by a sergeant or staff sergeant. Some units have two squads that made up a section, commanded by a staff sergeant.
  • Platoon. Normally, a platoon includes 16 to 44 soldiers and is led by a lieutenant with an NCO as second in command. A platoon usually consists of three to four squads or sections.
  • Company. A company contains three to five platoons and a total of 60 to 200 soldiers. It's commanded by a captain with a first sergeant as the commander's principal NCO assistant. If the element is an artillery unit, it's called a battery rather than a company. If it's armored or air cavalry, it's called a troop. A company is a tactical sized unit and can perform a battlefield function on its own.
  • Battalion. This encompasses four to six companies and between 300 and 1,000 soldiers. A battalion normally is commanded by a lieutenant colonel, and a command sergeant major serves as principal NCO assistant. A battalion can conduct independent operations, if they're of limited scope and duration, and operates its own administration. An armored or air cavalry unit of equivalent size is known as a squadron.
If the soldier is on a US Army installation, the installation is usually referred to as a 'post' rather than a 'base.'
 

Arkline041

Potential Patron
Joined
Aug 3, 2018
Having worked as a civil servant at a US Army post for quite a few years, I can safely say that lieutenant colonels are never referred to as 'lieutenant'. Sometimes they are referred to as colonel in conversations.
Here's some information on US Army structure and ranks of commanders.
  • Squad/section. A squad, which is the smallest element in the Army structure, is typically made up of four to 10 soldiers and normally is commanded by a sergeant or staff sergeant. Some units have two squads that made up a section, commanded by a staff sergeant.
  • Platoon. Normally, a platoon includes 16 to 44 soldiers and is led by a lieutenant with an NCO as second in command. A platoon usually consists of three to four squads or sections.
  • Company. A company contains three to five platoons and a total of 60 to 200 soldiers. It's commanded by a captain with a first sergeant as the commander's principal NCO assistant. If the element is an artillery unit, it's called a battery rather than a company. If it's armored or air cavalry, it's called a troop. A company is a tactical sized unit and can perform a battlefield function on its own.
  • Battalion. This encompasses four to six companies and between 300 and 1,000 soldiers. A battalion normally is commanded by a lieutenant colonel, and a command sergeant major serves as principal NCO assistant. A battalion can conduct independent operations, if they're of limited scope and duration, and operates its own administration. An armored or air cavalry unit of equivalent size is known as a squadron.
If the soldier is on a US Army installation, the installation is usually referred to as a 'post' rather than a 'base.'
Hey thanks for the info. This was just something random that I came up with out of boredom that I wanted to share. I think I can use this to improve the dialogue a little bit when I have the time, since the backstory was also something that resulted from the boredom. And you've improved my knowledge on how the US Army is structured too! :smile:
 

Antimatter42

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Sep 2, 2017
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Having worked as a civil servant at a US Army post for quite a few years, I can safely say that lieutenant colonels are never referred to as 'lieutenant'. Sometimes they are referred to as colonel in conversations.
Here's some information on US Army structure and ranks of commanders.
  • Squad/section. A squad, which is the smallest element in the Army structure, is typically made up of four to 10 soldiers and normally is commanded by a sergeant or staff sergeant. Some units have two squads that made up a section, commanded by a staff sergeant.
  • Platoon. Normally, a platoon includes 16 to 44 soldiers and is led by a lieutenant with an NCO as second in command. A platoon usually consists of three to four squads or sections.
  • Company. A company contains three to five platoons and a total of 60 to 200 soldiers. It's commanded by a captain with a first sergeant as the commander's principal NCO assistant. If the element is an artillery unit, it's called a battery rather than a company. If it's armored or air cavalry, it's called a troop. A company is a tactical sized unit and can perform a battlefield function on its own.
  • Battalion. This encompasses four to six companies and between 300 and 1,000 soldiers. A battalion normally is commanded by a lieutenant colonel, and a command sergeant major serves as principal NCO assistant. A battalion can conduct independent operations, if they're of limited scope and duration, and operates its own administration. An armored or air cavalry unit of equivalent size is known as a squadron.
If the soldier is on a US Army installation, the installation is usually referred to as a 'post' rather than a 'base.'
Oh. That's very interesting.
 
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